Legenda books are regularly reviewed in scholarly journals across the world, and sometimes also in literary papers such as the Times Literary Supplement. From time to time, our books also appear in Europe’s newspapers, from The Independent and the Daily Telegraph to El Imparcial and Gazeta Shqiptare. The following excerpts are from the 20 most recently received reviews:

  • Symbol and Intuition: Comparative Studies in Kantian and Romantic-Period Aesthetics — Edited by Helmut Hühn and James Vigus:  ‘Skilfully planned and structured, the volume offers original research on less familiar material while it lucidly covers most of the essential formulations of the symbol from the late eighteenth century onwards, thus speaking to readers of different backgrounds... It is Hühn and Vigus’s broad conception of the subject that ensures the collection’s originality and secures its unique place among the increasing studies of the symbol.’ — Stephanie Dumke, Angermion 7, 2014, 191-93
  • Selected Essays of Malcolm Bowie II: Song ManMalcolm Bowie:  ‘Bowie’s style appeals both to generalist and specialist readers; his clarity makes it possible for all to follow the argument even in his more technical writings, while the sharpness of his insights make his pieces for general audiences appealing to specialists as well. His writing always strikes a balance between sophistication and accessibility, often with a dose of wit (see especially his delightful self-review of Proust Among the Stars [II: 203-6]), allowing us to travel with him through our own areas of expertise and amateur interest.’ — Joseph Acquisto, Nineteenth-Century French Studies 43.1-2, 2014
  • Selected Essays of Malcolm Bowie I: Dreams of KnowledgeMalcolm Bowie:  ‘His readings are always marked by a resistance to easy answers that would attempt to reduce or deny the complexity of the text under analysis; the role of the critic is to illuminate that complexity, giving close attention to the way the text functions and how it guides the reader to a range of potential interpretive moves. While he is a highly trustworthy guide through the intricacies of the text, as he himself writes in an essay on Mallarmé, ‘somehow the passage through imbricated levels of utterance towards some final state of achieved propositional clarity is never quite the point’ (I: 152).’ — Joseph Acquisto, Nineteenth-Century French Studies 43.1-2, 2014
  • Zola, The Body Modern: Pressures and Prospects of RepresentationSusan Harrow:  ‘Overall, this is a brilliant and path-breaking work, one that largely succeeds in remediating the oversights of much previous criticism and in demonstrating how (and why) to read Zola today... An important and stimulating book that should be compulsory reading not only for Zola specialists, but indeed for anyone interested in nineteenth-century France and the writing of modernity.’ — Jessica Tanner, Nineteenth-Century French Studies 43.1-2, 2014
  • Narrative Responses to the Trauma of the French RevolutionKatherine Astbury:  ‘Astbury’s clear, elegant prose engages the reader and Astbury convincingly shows how the fiction of the Revolutionary decade, while perhaps not overtly political, nonetheless responded to Revolutionary events—whether through portrayals of moral regeneration in 1791 or through tales of exile in 1797.’ — Annie K. Smart, Nineteenth-Century French Studies 43.1-2, 2014
  • Photobiography: Photographic Self-Writing in Proust, Guibert, Ernaux, MacéAkane Kawakami:  ‘This volume provides a readable introduction to photobiography and faithful syntheses of the texts. With its wealth of bilingual quotation, its consistent clarity, and a particularly strong chapter on Ernaux, Kawakami has fashioned a volume that could also work extremely well as a course book.’ — Paul Edwards, Screen 79, Summer 2014, 65-66
  • Seamus Heaney and East European Poetry in Translation: Poetics of ExileCarmen Bugan:  ‘A densely researched and lucid study of a poetic congeniality that Heaney experienced with four East European poets... Published in the year that saw the death of this most influential of contemporary poets, it represents a fitting tribute to Heaney’s relational poetics.’ — Rui Carvalho Homem, Translation and Literature 23.3, 2014, 412-16
  • Stendhal’s Less-Loved Heroines: Fiction, Freedom, and the FemaleMaria C. Scott:  ‘Engaging reading. As the title suggests, the author gets personally involved and defends these fictional characters almost as if they were friends, women whose company she would like to keep, and she wants us to love them too. The style is alert, the tone optimistic, and while she necessarily has her work cut out for her convincing us that less-loved characters are lovable, her writing has the type of energy that makes readers love Stendhal.’ — Brigitte Malhuzier, Nineteenth-Century French Studies 43.1-2, 2014
  • Stendhal’s Less-Loved Heroines: Fiction, Freedom, and the FemaleMaria C. Scott:  ‘Disons-le d’entrée, et sans barguigner: ce livre, petit par le volume, est un grand livre... une étude aussi originale que pertinente, propre à renouveler en profondeur l’approche des personnages féminins stendhaliens... M. Scott a l’insigne mérite de s’attaquer intrépidement aux textes majeurs, de dominer l’ensemble des commentaires et d’apporter "du nouveau" dans des domaines depuis longtemps reconnus et parcourus, et qu’on croyait à jamais connus.’ — Yves Ansel, L'Année stendhalienne 13, 2014, 441-47
  • Dante and Epicurus: A Dualistic Vision of Secular and Spiritual FulfilmentGeorge Corbett:  ‘Corbett’s book is well written, accurate, and rigorously argued. The thesis that Dante’s Commedia presents a dualistic vision of the fulfilment of mankind is innovative and compelling for a new scholarly criticism of the Commedia. The first part on Dante’s reception of Epicureanism is the most persuasive and ground-breaking; it shows how the reconstruction of Dante’s sources is essential for understanding his reception of ancient literature and philosophy.’ — Filippo Gianferrari, Annali d'italianistica 32, 2014, 593-95
  • Dream Cities: Utopia and Prose by Poets in Nineteenth-Century FranceGreg Kerr:  ‘A significant contribution to our understanding of the ways that utopian and journalistic writing can be juxtaposed alongside the prose poem and other visual and architectural projections of urban futurity. Kerr convincingly shows how this set of disparate phenomena collectively reflects the dynamic, uncertain, and ultimately unfulfilled desires of a society en quête de forme.’ — Daniel Sipe, Nineteenth-Century French Studies 43.1-2, 2014
  • Photobiography: Photographic Self-Writing in Proust, Guibert, Ernaux, MacéAkane Kawakami:  ‘All in all, this study brings a new perspective to bear on the study of autobiography that is in keeping with the times both thematically and theoretically. The photobio- graphical text reveals dimensions of personal experience that engage both text and image, reality and fantasy, writer and reader.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.4, October 2014, 508
  • Form and Feeling in Modern Literature: Essays in Honour of Barbara Hardy — Edited by William Baker with Isobel Armstrong:  ‘An excellent tribute to the work of Professor Hardy; however, the critical essays and their approach to fiction in the nineteenth century also make this collection of interest to scholars in the field who may not be as familiar with the work of Hardy.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.4, October 2014, 506
  • Taboo: Corporeal Secrets in Nineteenth-Century FranceHannah Thompson:  ‘Throughout, Thompson identifies a variety of critical perspectives that throw those taboos into sharper focus, from seminal reference points such as Freud, Sontag and Butler to the emerging field of Disability Studies, resulting in a thought-provoking exploration.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.4, October 2014, 510
  • Dissonance in the Republic of Letters: The Querelle des Gluckistes et des PiccinnistesMark Darlow:  ‘Mark Darlow’s excellent book is less concerned with questions about the extent to which Piccinni and other Italians imitated Gluck than with the wider context of the Querelle. This includes the politics of the Ope ́ra itself, as well as the literary, social and political dimensions of the affair. He has gone beyond the published collections of polemic to sources hitherto ignored.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.4, October 2014, 504
  • Childhood as Memory, Myth and Metaphor: Proust, Beckett, and BourgeoisCatherine Crimp:  ‘The study is informed by a wide array of philosophical and theoretical points of reference and relies especially on Maurice Blanchot’s writing to make a convincing case for the importance of childhood in the oeuvres of Proust, Beckett and Bourgeois.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.4, October 2014, 504
  • Proust, the One, and the Many: Identity and Difference in A la recherche du temps perduErika Fülöp:  ‘L’originalité de ce livre clair, convaincant et bien documenté consiste à offrir de la Recherche une perspective éthique au sens où le narrateur, qui dès le départ poursuit un projet littéraire, est aussi en quête d’une approche harmonieuse du monde, de la vie et de l’autre.’ — Dominique Poncelet, French Review 88.2, October 2014, 227
  • The Subversive Poetics of Alfred Jarry: Ubusing Culture in the Almanachs du Père UbuMarieke Dubbelboer:  ‘This cogent, insightful study analyzes the sophisticated collage-based social satire in the critically underrepresented Almanachs du Père Ubu (1898, 1901). Through close readings and archival research, Dubbelboer immerses us in Jarry’s inspired fusion of art and life.’ — Aaron Prevots, French Review 88.2, October 2014, 223
  • Dante and Epicurus: A Dualistic Vision of Secular and Spiritual FulfilmentGeorge Corbett:  ‘L’importante lavoro di George Corbett si propone di indagare in maniera esaustiva l’influenza esercitata dal pensiero filosofico epicureo nell’opera dantesca [...] l’autore si interroga su due questioni fondamentali: quali sono i testi che possono aver influenzato la ricezione di Dante dell’Epicureismo e in che modo il poeta riesce a rappresentare Epicuro e gli epicurei nelle sue opere.’ — Claudia Tardelli Terry, Italian Studies 69.3, November 2014, 449-50
  • Sebald’s Bachelors: Queer Resistance and the Unconforming LifeHelen Finch:  ‘Helen Finch’s genuinely ground-breaking study of the work of W. G. Sebald explores the hitherto under-researched dimension of queer affinities and non-conformist lives in both the fictional and, crucially, the critical work of the now canonical writer... This is an important addition to the critical material and will challenge any interested Sebald scholar.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.4, 2014, 505-06