Legenda books are regularly reviewed in scholarly journals across the world, and sometimes also in literary papers such as the Times Literary Supplement. From time to time, our books also appear in Europe’s newspapers, from The Independent and the Daily Telegraph to El Imparcial and Gazeta Shqiptare. The following excerpts are from the 20 most recently received reviews:

  • Théodore de Banville: Constructing Poetic Value in Nineteenth-Century FranceDavid Evans:  ‘Théodore de Banville a longtemps été considéré par la critique comme un funambule de la versification […]. Pourtant, l’auteur du Petit Traité de poésie française a été vu également comme un législateur du Parnasse inflexible […]. Le stimulant essai que lui consacre David Evans […] fait voler en éclats ce paradoxe de la critique en révélant la profondeur que la poésie banvillienne cache sous son apparente frivolité. […] L’analyse très pertinente de certains poèmes […] permet à David Evans d’expliquer comment Banville a mêlé, dans ses poèmes à forme fixe, le respect de la tradition et l’esprit d’innovation.’ — Yann Mortelette, Revue d'histoire litteraire de la France 115.4, 2015
  • Alejo Carpentier and the Musical TextKatia Chornik:  ‘Como declara la autora, este ensayo se orienta a muy variados lectores potenciales: estudiosos de la obra de Carpentier, tanto desde el punto de vista estrictamente literario como desde el ángulo de la musicología. Pero su carácter explicativo y la transparencia de su prosa lo hacen asequible también a aquellos que de manera general disfrutan la obra de nuestro novelista.’Fundación Carpentier www.fundacioncarpentier.cult.cu, 18 January 2016
  • The Latin American Short Story at its Limits: Fragmentation, Hybridity and IntermedialityLucy Bell:  ‘This study adds to the scholarly criticism of these three authors [Rulfo, Cortázar, Monterroso] and suggests a potentially productive approach that extends beyond Latin American studies into the field of Comparative Literature.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 52.1, 2016, 113-14
  • Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe: (Un)timely MeditationsJohn McKeane:  ‘With an irresistible combination of patience, precision, lucidity, and forceful intellectual engagement, McKeane gives us Lacoue-Labarthe in all his compelling dispersion... This is an excellent and enlightening book, and highly recommended.’ — Martin Crowley, French Studies 70.1, January 2016, 130
  • Edoardo Sanguineti: Literature, Ideology and the Avant-Garde — Edited by Paolo Chirumbolo and John Picchione:  ‘A tre anni dalla scomparsa di Edoardo Sanguineti, Paolo Chirumbolo e John Picchione propongono questo interessantissimo volume dedicato al poeta genovese. I due curatori sono da annoverare fra i più prolifici ed attenti critici letterari sulla neoavanguardia italiana in Nord America... Un’autentica perla, un volume essenziale per chi volesse non solo occuparsi di uno dei guru dello sperimentalismo italiano, ma anche per chi intendesse affrontare il variegato mondo della neoavanguardia italiana con più ampio respiro.’ — Beppe Cavatorta, Annali d’italianistica 32, 2014, 670-72
  • Edoardo Sanguineti: Literature, Ideology and the Avant-Garde — Edited by Paolo Chirumbolo and John Picchione:  ‘This dense but lucid collection makes a timely and valuable contribution to studies of Sanguineti’s works and influence. The combination of critical and personal essays will make this volume particularly compelling to scholars interested in Sanguineti’s legacy.’ — Mary Migliozzi, Forum Italicum 250-53
  • Sebald’s Bachelors: Queer Resistance and the Unconforming LifeHelen Finch:  ‘Finch’s original and compelling reading of the bachelor trope is a particularly progressive addition, not only to existing scholarship on Sebald’s writing, but also to queer literary theory more broadly... This significant new perspective demonstrates not only how queer figures haunt the works of Sebald, but also how his unconforming bachelors continue to haunt the German queer literary tradition.’ — Hannah O’Connor, Assuming Gender 4.1, 2014, 81-84
  • Sebald’s Bachelors: Queer Resistance and the Unconforming LifeHelen Finch:  ‘Despite my reservations, there is much to admire here: finally, the queer dimension of the Sebaldian is comprehensively explored; the book serves as a report on the condition of Sebald scholarship; and in its own way it is consistently argued and tightly phrased. Sebald’s Bachelors is undoubtedly a provocative springboard for students and scholars engaging with Sebald’s oeuvre. But the project of queer Sebald remains radically open to further critical enquiry.’ — Christopher Madden, Textual Practice 29.2, 2015, 396-400
  • Photobiography: Photographic Self-Writing in Proust, Guibert, Ernaux, MacéAkane Kawakami:  ‘Kawakami’s lively new study of a particular brand of contemporary photo-textual practice signals a photographic turn in narratives of the self... Kawakami compellingly considers how Guibert, Ernaux, and Macé use photography to complicate the already ambiguous generic status of their texts, which hover on the border between document and fiction.’ — Ari J. Blatt, French Review 89.1, 2015, 228
  • French Divorce Fiction from the Revolution to the First World WarNicholas White:  ‘Témoignant d’une profonde érudition, apportant une grande attention aux contextes idéologiques et biographiques, cet essai sans équivalent, aux analyses perspicaces, aux enjeux précis, à l’écriture claire et non départie d’humour, offre une lecture aussi enrichissante qu’agréable.’ — Claudie Bernard, French Review 89.1, 2015, 288
  • Taboo: Corporeal Secrets in Nineteenth-Century FranceHannah Thompson:  ‘This is a valuable contribution to the growing field of studies investigating the literary body.’ — Bernadette Lintz, French Review 89.1, 2015, 282
  • Stendhal’s Less-Loved Heroines: Fiction, Freedom, and the FemaleMaria C. Scott:  ‘Offering a “sympathetic reading of [Stendhal’s] heroines that have often been seen as unsympathetic or unworthy of the love of the heroes and readers alike”, Scott approaches her analysis from a feminist perspective, using French existentialism— particularly Sartre’s and Beauvoir’s notions of freedom—as her theoretical framework... Written in an approachable style, this thought-provoking study offers a new perspective on Stendhal’s work, and is sure to be of interest to scholars and readers of the nineteenth-century author.’ — Kathryn M. Bulver, French Review 89.1, 2015, 280
  • Pessoa’s Geometry of the Abyss: Modernity and the Book of DisquietPaulo de Medeiros:  ‘This dense book, full of creative suggestions and a thorough knowledge of the modern background, places Pessoa and the Book of Disquiet center stage in its probing and questioning of the meaning of modernity in one of its most complex and compelling avatars.’ — K. David Jackson, Luso-Brazilian Review 52.2, 2015, 196-98
  • Traces of Trauma in W. G. Sebald and Christoph RansmayrDora Osborne:  ‘The detailed analyses and dynamic argumentation in addition to the illuminating introduction of the concept of ‘post-postwar literature’ make this study a significant contribution to scholarship on both Ransmayr and Sebald and to critical considerations of twentieth-century post-Holocaust literature in German more broadly.’ — Lynn L. Wolff, Modern Language Review 111.1, January 2016, 294-96
  • Sebald’s Bachelors: Queer Resistance and the Unconforming LifeHelen Finch:  ‘Finch’s study illuminates the underexplored dimension of Sebald’s oeuvre, sexuality in general and queerness in particular, making an important contribution to Sebald scholarship.’ — Lynn L. Wolff, Modern Language Review 111.1, January 2016, 292-94
  • Edoardo Sanguineti: Literature, Ideology and the Avant-Garde — Edited by Paolo Chirumbolo and John Picchione:  ‘Chirumbolo and Picchione’s impressive volume represents a significant and timely addition to the field, which scholars of Sanguineti will want to follow and explore in the future.’ — Florian Mussgnug, Modern Language Review 111.1, January 2016, 268-70
  • Selected Essays of Malcolm Bowie II: Song ManMalcolm Bowie:  ‘Evidence abounds in these pieces of Bowie’s keen appetite for intrinsically difficult subject-matter. Indeed, his ability to sustain his critical nerve in the handling of complex material was to become a hallmark of his achievement... Yet alongside this intensity of engagement with serious subject-matter, we also see the poise and panache of a critic who was so evidently at home with textual composition.’ — Edward J. Hughes, Modern Language Review 111.1, January 2016, 228-29
  • Selected Essays of Malcolm Bowie I: Dreams of KnowledgeMalcolm Bowie:  ‘Evidence abounds in these pieces of Bowie’s keen appetite for intrinsically difficult subject-matter. Indeed, his ability to sustain his critical nerve in the handling of complex material was to become a hallmark of his achievement... Yet alongside this intensity of engagement with serious subject-matter, we also see the poise and panache of a critic who was so evidently at home with textual composition.’ — Edward J. Hughes, Modern Language Review 111.1, January 2016, 228-29
  • Women, Emancipation and the German Novel 1871-1910: Protest Fiction in its Cultural ContextCharlotte Woodford:  ‘It has been estimated that women constituted one-third of the authors of the century. However, women’s protest writing encountered a backlash around the time of World War I: it was viewed as contrary to the true German attitude to gender relations, despised as a foreign implant from France and Scandinavia, and somehow Jewish. The women writers disappeared from the literary histories, and most of them remained invisible until the time I was a student... Woodford’s book is recommendable to teachers and students working in this period because it is full of indicators of how one might enrich the fabric of literary life of the time.’ — Jeffrey L. Sammons, Monatshefte 107.4, December 2015, 673-76
  • Postcolonial Criticism and Representations of African Dictatorship: The Aesthetics of TyrannyCécile Bishop:  ‘A cultural interpretation that often transcends its focus on the postcolonial project in order to raise important questions regarding the work of criticism more generally... Ultimately, the book is an example of excellent scholarship that leads to a very thought-provoking consideration of the work of critical interpretation more widely.’ — Aedín Ní Loingsigh, H-France 15, November 2015, no. 163