Legenda books are regularly reviewed in scholarly journals across the world, and sometimes also in literary papers such as the Times Literary Supplement. From time to time, our books also appear in Europe’s newspapers, from The Independent and the Daily Telegraph to El Imparcial and Gazeta Shqiptare. The following excerpts are from the 20 most recently received reviews:

  • Dante and Epicurus: A Dualistic Vision of Secular and Spiritual FulfilmentGeorge Corbett:  ‘Corbett’s book is well written, accurate, and rigorously argued. The thesis that Dante’s Commedia presents a dualistic vision of the fulfilment of mankind is innovative and compelling for a new scholarly criticism of the Commedia. The first part on Dante’s reception of Epicureanism is the most persuasive and ground-breaking; it shows how the reconstruction of Dante’s sources is essential for understanding his reception of ancient literature and philosophy.’ — Filippo Gianferrari, Annali d'italianistica 32, 2014, 593-95
  • Dream Cities: Utopia and Prose by Poets in Nineteenth-Century FranceGreg Kerr:  ‘A significant contribution to our understanding of the ways that utopian and journalistic writing can be juxtaposed alongside the prose poem and other visual and architectural projections of urban futurity. Kerr convincingly shows how this set of disparate phenomena collectively reflects the dynamic, uncertain, and ultimately unfulfilled desires of a society en quête de forme.’ — Daniel Sipe, Nineteenth-Century French Studies 43.1-2, 2014
  • Photobiography: Photographic Self-Writing in Proust, Guibert, Ernaux, MacéAkane Kawakami:  ‘All in all, this study brings a new perspective to bear on the study of autobiography that is in keeping with the times both thematically and theoretically. The photobio- graphical text reveals dimensions of personal experience that engage both text and image, reality and fantasy, writer and reader.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.4, October 2014, 508
  • Form and Feeling in Modern Literature: Essays in Honour of Barbara Hardy — Edited by William Baker with Isobel Armstrong:  ‘An excellent tribute to the work of Professor Hardy; however, the critical essays and their approach to fiction in the nineteenth century also make this collection of interest to scholars in the field who may not be as familiar with the work of Hardy.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.4, October 2014, 506
  • Taboo: Corporeal Secrets in Nineteenth-Century FranceHannah Thompson:  ‘Throughout, Thompson identifies a variety of critical perspectives that throw those taboos into sharper focus, from seminal reference points such as Freud, Sontag and Butler to the emerging field of Disability Studies, resulting in a thought-provoking exploration.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.4, October 2014, 510
  • Dissonance in the Republic of Letters: The Querelle des Gluckistes et des PiccinnistesMark Darlow:  ‘Mark Darlow’s excellent book is less concerned with questions about the extent to which Piccinni and other Italians imitated Gluck than with the wider context of the Querelle. This includes the politics of the Ope ́ra itself, as well as the literary, social and political dimensions of the affair. He has gone beyond the published collections of polemic to sources hitherto ignored.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.4, October 2014, 504
  • Childhood as Memory, Myth and Metaphor: Proust, Beckett, and BourgeoisCatherine Crimp:  ‘The study is informed by a wide array of philosophical and theoretical points of reference and relies especially on Maurice Blanchot’s writing to make a convincing case for the importance of childhood in the oeuvres of Proust, Beckett and Bourgeois.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.4, October 2014, 504
  • Proust, the One, and the Many: Identity and Difference in A la recherche du temps perduErika Fülöp:  ‘L’originalité de ce livre clair, convaincant et bien documenté consiste à offrir de la Recherche une perspective éthique au sens où le narrateur, qui dès le départ poursuit un projet littéraire, est aussi en quête d’une approche harmonieuse du monde, de la vie et de l’autre.’ — Dominique Poncelet, French Review 88.2, October 2014, 227
  • The Subversive Poetics of Alfred Jarry: Ubusing Culture in the Almanachs du Père UbuMarieke Dubbelboer:  ‘This cogent, insightful study analyzes the sophisticated collage-based social satire in the critically underrepresented Almanachs du Père Ubu (1898, 1901). Through close readings and archival research, Dubbelboer immerses us in Jarry’s inspired fusion of art and life.’ — Aaron Prevots, French Review 88.2, October 2014, 223
  • Dante and Epicurus: A Dualistic Vision of Secular and Spiritual FulfilmentGeorge Corbett:  ‘L’importante lavoro di George Corbett si propone di indagare in maniera esaustiva l’influenza esercitata dal pensiero filosofico epicureo nell’opera dantesca [...] l’autore si interroga su due questioni fondamentali: quali sono i testi che possono aver influenzato la ricezione di Dante dell’Epicureismo e in che modo il poeta riesce a rappresentare Epicuro e gli epicurei nelle sue opere.’ — Claudia Tardelli Terry, Italian Studies 69.3, November 2014, 449-50
  • Sebald’s Bachelors: Queer Resistance and the Unconforming LifeHelen Finch:  ‘Helen Finch’s genuinely ground-breaking study of the work of W. G. Sebald explores the hitherto under-researched dimension of queer affinities and non-conformist lives in both the fictional and, crucially, the critical work of the now canonical writer... This is an important addition to the critical material and will challenge any interested Sebald scholar.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.4, 2014, 505-06
  • Desire in Dante and the Middle Ages — Edited by Manuele Gragnolati, Tristan Kay, Elena Lombardi and Francesca Southerden:  ‘This is a well-conceived collection, with an excellent bibliography, that will be valuable both for Dante scholars and every medievalist or early modernist with an interest in topics related to desire: the body, perception, memory, mysticism, just to name a few. The volume achieves a rare balance of interdisciplinarity and cohesiveness, bringing together approaches to the text as diverse as queer theory and translation studies, but maintaining a common intent to map desire as a hermeneutic tool in Dante studies and beyond.’ — Eleonora Stoppino, Speculum 89.3, 2014, 773-74
  • The Livres-Souvenirs of Colette: Genre and the Telling of TimeAnne Freadman:  ‘The rich and varied readings of the material, competently informed by theoretical input, together with acute sensitivity to the corpus, mark out this study as incontournable for Colette scholars.’ — Hélène Stafford, Modern and Contemporary France 22.3, 2014, 407-09
  • French Divorce Fiction from the Revolution to the First World WarNicholas White:  ‘An important contribution to the study of nineteenth-century French literature and the family. The authors covered are an exciting selection of, as White puts it, ‘unknown women and forgotten men’. He displays tremendous knowledge of the corpus and authors, but also of the eras and literary movements discussed. His inspired choice to conclude with American novelist Diane Johnson’s 1997 Le Divorce brings his story to the present, but also contributes to his broader argument about the literary value of texts beyond the canon.’ — Phoebe Maltz Bovy, Modern Language Review 109.4, October 2014, 1086-87
  • Iris Murdoch and Elias Canetti: Intellectual AlliesElaine Morley:  ‘As Elaine Morley aptly observes in her exciting and innovative book, the majority of publications foreground personality and relationship issues but allow little room for discussion of the creative affinity between the two authors... The much-needed shift of focus from the personal to the literary and philosophical in Morley’s analysis of Murdoch and Canetti as intellectual allies is path-breaking.’ — Dagmar C. G. Lorenz, Modern Language Review 109.4, October 2014, 1142-43
  • Goethe’s Visual WorldPamela Currie:  ‘Pamela Currie’s arguments never fail to challenge the reader, but are crafted with a lightness of touch, and display a sustained resistance to theoretical excess. The book works across genres and disciplines—and it works beautifully. It is a fitting way to remember a much-respected scholar, who died as the book was in preparation.’ — Charlotte Lee, Modern Language Review 109.4, October 2014, 1122-23
  • The Livres-Souvenirs of Colette: Genre and the Telling of TimeAnne Freadman:  ‘A new and convincing account of genre and autobiography in a selection of Colette’s more autobiographical writings... This book will be indispensable for scholars of Colette and those interested in the genre of autobiography.’ — Kathleen Antonioli, Modern Language Review 109.4, October 2014, 1088-89
  • Stendhal’s Less-Loved Heroines: Fiction, Freedom, and the FemaleMaria C. Scott:  ‘This is a concise, elegant, and original reassessment of some of Stendhal’s most important and, as it turns out, misunderstood heroines that will be of equal interest to both specialist scholars and students keen to challenge the dominant critical view of these female characters as limited and frustrated by their narrative possibilities.’ — Susannah Wilson, Modern Language Review 109.4, October 2014, 1084-85
  • Photobiography: Photographic Self-Writing in Proust, Guibert, Ernaux, MacéAkane Kawakami:  ‘An important addition to literature on the subject. Kawakami’s conclusion is that we are entering a new age of writing about ourselves photographically. Researchers exploring the self-perceptions that are made available in the lens-inflected self-narratives of this new age will surely gain from setting their findings into context by reading this extremely rewarding study.’ — Shirley Jordan, French Studies 68.4, October 2014, 580-81
  • Method and Variation: Narrative in Early Modern French Thought — Edited by Emma Gilby and Paul White:  ‘This timely and important volume addresses the role of narration in revealing early modern French belief patterns... In demonstrating the range of ways in which early modern authors reconfigure and renegotiate narrative’s relationship to thought, argument, and proof, the contributors to this volume together add critical understanding to the complex articulation of fable, history, and argument in the early modern period.’ — Allison Stedman, French Studies 68.4, October 2014, 542-43