Legenda books are regularly reviewed in scholarly journals across the world, and sometimes also in literary papers such as the Times Literary Supplement. From time to time, our books also appear in Europe’s newspapers, from The Independent and the Daily Telegraph to El Imparcial and Gazeta Shqiptare. The following excerpts are from the 20 most recently received reviews:

  • French Divorce Fiction from the Revolution to the First World WarNicholas White:  ‘A persuasive study of a society, and its literature, exploring the implications of new ideas of personal freedom.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.2, April 2014, 232
  • Renaissance Keywords — Edited by Ita Mac Carthy:  ‘A thoughtful, well-written and engaging volume whose accessible presentation of wide-ranging but precise detail should appeal to the Renaissance specialist and the general reader alike.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.2, April 2014, 231
  • Method and Variation: Narrative in Early Modern French Thought — Edited by Emma Gilby and Paul White:  ‘Overall, this is an engaging volume that usefully emphasizes the narrative methods and less scientific genres which underlie early modern French thought and its philosophical fictions.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.2, April 2014, 230-31
  • French Divorce Fiction from the Revolution to the First World WarNicholas White:  ‘Fortunately for nineteenth-century French readers, the advent of divorce did not signal an untimely end to the marriage of familial and plot structures... And just as fortunately for contemporary readers, Nicholas White has provided the first study of these distinctively modern tales, deftly weaving long-forgotten divorce novels, many of them quite popular in their time, into a complex and insightful broader sociocultural but also deeply literary and historical narrative.’ — Rachel Mesch, Romanic Review 2014, 104.1-2, 172-74
  • Narrative Responses to the Trauma of the French RevolutionKatherine Astbury:  ‘One of the great merits of the book is that Astbury has actually read, rather than glossed, these unloved novels. As a result, she can demonstrate how ostensibly escapist fiction was saturated with contemporary references... The book provides fresh and detailed exposition of key novels within the revolutionary corpus, and triumphantly succeeds in making a case for the political sub-currents bubbling away within some seemingly innocuous fiction.’ — Tom Stammers, French History March 2014, 28.1, 126-27
  • Narrative Responses to the Trauma of the French RevolutionKatherine Astbury:  ‘Astbury offers an original theoretical approach to the fiction of the 1790s and sheds new light on many of these forgotten texts. Her study will be welcomed by eighteenth-century scholars.’ — Ruth P. Thomas, New Perspectives on the Eighteenth Century Spring 2014, 11.1, 86-88
  • Dissonance in the Republic of Letters: The Querelle des Gluckistes et des PiccinnistesMark Darlow:  ‘Darlow quotes generously from a wide selection of the many texts that contributed to the quarrel, from the writings of well-known authors to anonymous pamphlets. His profound and thoughtful study should be of interest not only to music specialists, but to anyone with an interest in eighteenth-century aesthetics and ideas.’ — Derek Connon, Modern Language Review April 2014, 109.2, 513-14
  • German Women’s Writing of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries: Future Directions in Feminist Criticism — Edited by Helen Fronius and Anna Richards:  ‘Thus the book’s structure, like its title, ultimately collapses: the future has not yet happened. Yet it is glimpsed here—and it will indeed necessarily entail killing off and reviving the female author and the female reader, undoing and redoing gender, sexuality, and herstory, embracing pluralism and firing the canon. And it will only have been achieved once the gatekeepers become contributors and all critics—including men—are doing feminist criticism.’ — Robert Gillett, Modern Language Review April 2014, 109.2, 547-48
  • Holocaust Intersections: Genocide and Visual Culture at the New Millennium — Edited by Axel Bangert, Robert S. C. Gordon and Libby Saxton:  ‘The ‘millennium’ of this book’s title stands for the reconstitution of Europe since the end of the Cold War — one effect of which has been an enhanced knowledge of the Holocaust based on archives in the former Eastern Bloc — and for the rise of digital media during the same period.’ — Henry K. Miller, Sight and Sound April 2014, 106
  • Goethe’s Visual WorldPamela Currie:  ‘This volume is a marvelous study of how Goethe participated in perception theory, physics, cognition studies, and psychology. Currie’s work is a significant step toward uncovering and clarifying some of the mental images and cognitive elements that are already critically reflected in Goethe’s perceptive writings.’ — Beate Allert, Monatshefte 105.4, 2013, 716-18
  • The Truth of Realism: A Reassessment of the German Novel 1830-1900John Walker:  ‘This volume offers a new approach to German Realism and contributes to research that establishes a reading of German Realist literature as in no ways inferior to other European Realist traditions, which has been the dominant viewpoint for decades.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 49.2, 2013, 227
  • Seamus Heaney and East European Poetry in Translation: Poetics of ExileCarmen Bugan:  ‘A well-documented and insightful study of one of the few aspects of Seamus Heaney’s work that still needs attention. As Irish studies are becoming increasingly comparative and intercultural, this is a very welcome addition to the academic discussion on Seamus Heaney’s work and on Irish literature in general.’ — Florence Impens, Irish Studies Review 2014
  • Women, Genre and Circumstance: Essays in Memory of Elizabeth Fallaize — Edited by Margaret Atack, Diana Holmes, Diana Knight and Judith Still:  ‘The chapters which form this scholarly homage... keep the dialogue open with a scholar, teacher, feminist and mentor who spent her life engaging with French literature. Yet, each contribution, particularly those of Michèle le Doeuff, Ursula Tidd and Diana Holmes, offers intellectual stimulation in its own right.’ — France Grenaudier-Klign, New Zealand Journal of French Studies 34.2, 2014, 130-32
  • The Livres-Souvenirs of Colette: Genre and the Telling of TimeAnne Freadman:  ‘What shines through brightly across the entirety of Friedman’s analysis is the sensitivity with which she highlights Colette’s narrative intentions... A highly valuable addition to the scholarly activity currently produced on Colette.’ — Eileen M. Angelini, New Zealand Journal of French Studies 34.2, 2014, 125-26
  • Sebald’s Bachelors: Queer Resistance and the Unconforming LifeHelen Finch:  ‘Brillant ist das Buch von Finch überall da, wo es — dem Versprechen des Untertitels getreu — den Themen ‘Queer Resistance and the Unconforming Life’ bei Sebald nachgeht. Sie identifiziert das Werk durchgehende Motive oder zeigt höchst überzeugend, wie queerness und Erzählform bei ‘Schwindel. Gefühle’ zusammenhängen.’ — Uwe Schutte, Skug 97.1-3, 2014, 63-64
  • Seamus Heaney and East European Poetry in Translation: Poetics of ExileCarmen Bugan:  ‘Though many critics have mentioned their influence, Carmen Bugan’s monograph is the first to offer a detailed, in-depth study of Heaney’s relationship with East European poets... This is a very good book, a massively and precisely documented scholarly study, written by someone who has a consummate knowledge of her subject.’ — Adolphe Haberer, The European English Messenger 22.2, 2013, 82-85
  • Translating the Perception of Text: Literary Translation and PhenomenologyClive Scott:  ‘The literary translation urged on us in this seismic manifesto is neither the creation of an object nor the reaching of a target: ‘Translation’s area of operation is not two langues, but language itself, and translation’s business is not merely to provide a version of a text, but to make the provision of that version a fruitful con- tribution to the development of the expressive potentialities of the language medium’.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.1, January 2014, 130-31
  • Translating the Perception of Text: Literary Translation and PhenomenologyClive Scott:  ‘In echoing Walter Benjamin’s disapproval of the view that a translation is intended for ‘readers who do not understand the original’, Clive Scott convincingly argues in favour of translation as a literary art that helps promote the language of the source text rather than seeks to provide substitutes for it.’ — Ramona Fotiade, French Studies 68.1, January 2014, 143-44
  • Dream Cities: Utopia and Prose by Poets in Nineteenth-Century FranceGreg Kerr:  ‘This work is a fascinating study of the ways in which the modern metropolis altered not only the content, but also the formal innovations of several nineteenth-century French writers... An innovative and valuable contribution to both urban and literary studies.’ — unsigned notice, Forum for Modern Language Studies 50.1, January 2014, 128
  • Dream Cities: Utopia and Prose by Poets in Nineteenth-Century FranceGreg Kerr:  ‘In this study Greg Kerr intriguingly argues that the contemporaneous development of the prose poem is closely associated with utopian dreaming, as if Baudelaire’s dream of a prose poétique, sufficiently supple and abrupt to adapt itself to the ‘mouvements lyriques de l’âme, aux ondulations de la rêverie, aux soubresauts de la conscience’ ... could alone do justice to these new social and physical structures.’ — Rosemary Lloyd, French Studies 68.1, January 2014, 118